Humanitarian Freight

 

When the goods to be dispatched do not correspond to the  « Messagerie Médicale », regulations, aid is delivered by Humanitarian Freight. Depending on the volume of these items and their destination,  Aviation Sans Frontières is able to arrange either air or sea freight.

 

How does it work ?

Only authorised associations (associations registered in the Official Journal for charity organisations) that can justify the humanitarian nature of their shipments are allowed to use Humanitarian Freight services.

 

Our partners

Air France Cargo offers significant discounts to Aviation Sans Frontières on all humanitarian freight shipping. When the destinations are not served by Air France, Aviation Sans Frontières can obtain preferential rates from partner freight senders which perform registering operations and export customs clearances. At the destination, each beneficiary is accountable for making the goods available to their recipients.

Aviation Sans Frontières’s partnership with corporate foundation Airbus Group and manufacturer ATR allows the organisation to benefit, on an exceptional basis, from free shipments on board new aircrafts during ferry flights or on older aircrafts travelling to Airbus sites for maintenance operations, with the agreement of the companies involved.

When using sea freight, Aviation Sans Frontières puts associations in contact with its seaport forwarder Nord/Sud, based in Rouen.

 

The Operation « L’Autre Noel »

Aviation Sans Frontières also works with the Musée du Quai Branly and the UN High Commissioner for Refugees for its l’Autre Noël (Another Christmas) operation. The aim of this operation is to bring smiles back to the faces of the children who have been confined in refugee camps by sending them toys for Christmas. Around 11,650 toys have been distributed since 2006. 

 

Key figures

In 2014, Aviation Sans Frontières sent more than  16 tons of emergency relief over 45 trips.

 

“One of the most memorable operations of the year was the exceptional dispatch of 3.5 tons of medical equipment to Niger. Together with the Lion’s Club Cachan Val de Bièvre, we managed to send inverters for MRI machines: equipment essential to treating sick people in the best way possible. Sending this shipment thousands of kilometres away caused us a few sleepless nights! What a delight to see photos of the hospital equipped and in good working order. I hope I will be having a lot more sleepless nights- and more often!” 
Daniel Loubery, in charge of Humanitarian Cargo.

Translation into English by Julian Malacan
Proof-reading in English by Chloe Anderson within the initiative PerMondo that is coordinated by the translation agency Mondo Agit

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